Connected Letters, Connected Thinking: How Cursive Writing Helps Us Learn

By Judy Packhem, M. Ed. Cursive writing is an endangered species these days. Left out of the Common Core State Standards, cursive is now seen as inconsequential, and even obsolete, by some in the education community. This is distressing to me, and it should be to all of you who care about educating our children, especially…

Pending Dyslexia Legislation in Massachusetts

by Nancy Duggan, MA. S.C. Decoding Dyslexia Massachusetts (DD-MA) began a campaign in 2012 to raise dyslexia awareness across the state through collaboration with parents, educators, and neuroscience researchers. The effort has made steady progress in building dyslexia awareness in the parent, educator, and policy-maker communities. Initiating Legislative Action One of DD-MA’s goals goals has been…

What Is a Language-Based Learning Disability?

Landmark360.org launched the five-part series What Is a Language-Based Learning Disability? to define and explain Language-Based Learning Disabilities (LBLD), offer tips on remediation, highlight the importance of early intervention, and give readers a glimpse into the life a family with a child with LBLD. Read these posts and give us feedback. We’re eager to know what you…

Language-Based Learning Disabilities on the Homefront

This is part five of the five-part series, What Is a Language-Based Learning Disability? In part one, Bob Broudo talks about the early awareness of and research into Language-Based Learning Disabilities (LBLDs), part two is primer on LBLDs, part three discusses remediation, and four highlights the importance of early intervention. By Angela Timpone Gowans After I returned from the grocery store for the third…

It’s a Myth That Young Children Cannot Be Screened for Dyslexia

This is part four of the five-part series, What Is a Language-Based Learning Disability? In part one, Bob Broudo talks about the early awareness of and research into Language-Based Learning Disabilities (LBLDs). Part two is primer on LBLDs, part three discusses remediation, and five features a day-in-the-life of a family with children with LBLD. Originally published on the International Dyslexia Association website,…

The Voices of Students Like Me

By Natalie Tamburello When you think about social movements that you learned about growing up, what do you remember? What do you see in your mind’s eye? For a moment, reflect on your experience when you learned about the civil rights movement. Were you sitting at your desk in a darkened history classroom, watching Dr. King…

Prevent Summer Learning Loss Before It Happens

Submitted by Joanna A. Christodoulou Reading activities during the summer can play an important role in helping students maintain their reading skills. Summer slump, or the potential for academic skills to regress during school vacation, is a concern for many students. Children with language-based learning disabilities, such as dyslexia, may be at a higher risk of…

Dyslexia: Learning Disability or Entrepreneurial Advantage?

Submitted by Elliot S. Weissbluth I was first diagnosed with dyslexia as a child, and then again 20 years later as an adult law school student. Dyslexia affects each individual a little differently, but generally creates difficulties for processing written language. It is often characterized as a “learning disability.” Early on, I struggled to keep up in…

Tips for Parents: Working with your LBLD student, Part 3

Homework: Importance and Procedures for Success Submitted by Gail Kent Ever have difficulty figuring out how to help your child with homework? Why is homework so important anyway? Homework is used to reinforce skills and information learned during class time. It is important for students because it allows them to further interact with material and…

Painted Yellow Lines

At Landmark School‘s recent commencement ceremony, graduate Matthew Pramas ’16 sheds light on what it means to learn differently and reminds his classmates that it can have its advantages.  I remember sitting on the swings, 11 years ago, on a beautiful spring day. My teacher let my class out to recess for the last 20 minutes…