What Is a Language-Based Learning Disability?

Landmark360.org launched the five-part series What Is a Language-Based Learning Disability? to define and explain Language-Based Learning Disabilities (LBLD), offer tips on remediation, highlight the importance of early intervention, and give readers a glimpse into the life a family with a child with LBLD.

Read these posts and give us feedback. We’re eager to know what you think.

Part One: What We Know About LBLD and Learning, by Bob Broudoflame
Part Two: Language-Based Learning Disabilities: A Primer, by Melody O’Neil
Part Three: Help Your Struggling Learner: Remediation Is a Key to Success, by Christine Ozahowski
Part Four: It’s a Myth That Young Children Cannot Be Screened for Dyslexia, by Nadine Gaab, PhD
Part Five: Language-Based Learning Disabilities on the Homefront, by Angela Timpone Gowans

2017BABadgeHoriz300

Landmark360.org’s post by Bob Broudo about LBLD and Learning won a 2017 Gold InspirED School Marketers Brilliance Award in the national competition that recognizes excellence in private and independent school marketing and communications.

3 Comments Add yours

  1. mjshadforth says:

    Fantastic collection of articles presented in a way that teachers, practitioners, and parents can digest. I have shared them far and wide, within the Dyslexia communities in Australia, Hong Kong, and beyond. People who have either been living with LBLD all their life, have children with LBLD, or those that work to improve the lives of those with LBLD have given wonderful feedback and gratitude to Landmark for this sharing. Keep it coming!

    1. Thanks for your kind words. Would you be open to allowing us to use this quote in a press release about the series? Thank you for your consideration.

  2. mjshadforth says:

    My one wish for the US is that the word disability is not tied to this learning difference. Neurodiversity brings more richness to our life experience, and I am grateful we have been gifted this in our family.

    I’m not opposed to labels, although the terminology of disablity rather than a difference carries a lot of stigma and energy for the person receiving the label, who already has more than enough hurdles to overcome without this additional burden.

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